Long Island Artists
Matt Harnick
My interest in Origami goes back to 1974 when the first Origami Holiday Tree was exhibited at the American Museum of Natrual History. I was given some instruction in simple origami by the volounteers at the teaching table, but most of the rest I discovered from independent study of books by such modern masters as the late Akira Yoshizawa, Kunihiko Kassahara, John Montroll and Robert J. Lang. Later, while volounteering for Origami USA (originally Friends of the Origami Center of America), I had the honor of interacting directly with many origami artists. I have quite a few of my own original designs which, several of which are diagrammed and can be found in OUSA publications. The Cattleya Orchid in my letterhead is one of my original origami designs
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Eric Ernst
Eric Ernst was born in Norwalk, Connecticut in 1956 into a family of some notoriety in the art world. Originally intent on avoiding any direct involvement in the arts himself, he graduated from George Washington University with a B.A. in Japanese Studies followed by an all-but-completed M.A. in the same subject from the University of Michigan (to this day he insists the actual writing of the master’s thesis should just be considered a minor formality). In between these academic respites, he lived in Japan working as an apprentice to a Japanese woodblock artist, studied Zen meditation, and was employed as a disc jockey at a Tokyo radio station under the pseudonym of “Reckless Eric, The Mad Artist of the Airwaves”. More importantly, his studies there were to later imbue his work with varied elements of Japanese and Oriental aesthetics in terms of coloration and concepts of rhythm and asymmetry in design. Further incorporating aspects highlighting the geometric purity of the Russian avant-garde and the later Bauhaus artists, he was also influenced by his father, Jimmy Ernst’s, approach to crisp, linear compositional structure. In addition, the works are also inspired by aspects of harmony and movement drawn from disparate musical sources such as Thelonious Monk, Miles Davis, Igor Stravinsky, and Frank Zappa. Structurally arranging the works to be viewed as small scale architectonic spaces, Ernst recently has begun incorporating elements of representational imagery into his constructions. These serve to create an interaction of forms, shapes, and colors that, mixed with musical and harmonic elements, conjure a more immediate narrative and strive to transcend the limits of pure geometric abstraction.
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Gayle Tudisco
Gayle has shown her work at Amagansett Applied Arts, Hampton Photo Arts, Guild Hall, the Water Mill Museum and the Rose Show at the Rogers Memorial Library of Southampton.  Her paintings are now on display at the Chrysalis Gallery in Southampton.Gayle has studied at Amagansett Applied Arts and the Golden Eagle and has also studied and painted with Mike Viera, Kimberly Munson, Howard Rose and other artists. Gayle is a member of Guild Hall, the East End Arts Council, the Artists Alliance of the East End, the Southampton Artists Association  and the Water Mill Museum.
 
Eric Fischl
Eric Fischl has become the painter laureate of American anxiety in the eighties. From the moment that he exhibited "Sleepwalker", 1979, his image of a teenage boy resentfully jerking off in a suburban wading pool, Fischl has zeroed in on the discontents of the White Tribe whose territory stretches from Scarsdale to Anaheim: unreachable kids, grotesque parents, small convulsions of voyeurism and barely concealed incestuous longing.
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Hector Leonardi

Essay by Jonathan Goodman

Hector Leonardi's works are filled with a passionate love of painting. His unusual skill as an abstract painter owes its evocative force to his command of color.

His palette can range from pastels to the somber; no matter what the hue is, however, he communicates a joy in the act of painting. In this sense he is close to the tradition of the New York School, both the color field artists and the gestural abstractionists. Color is a primary element in Leonardi's art—who would have thought that it might be used as a structural device, its application alone the basis of the artist's strong efforts? In the case of Leonardi, we see an artist in love with the application of paint, specifically acrylic paint, as an act of belief and beauty. The student of theorist and painter Joseph Albers at Yale, Leonardi comes across as a brilliant employer of color, in both its physical and metaphysical properties. He expresses his primarily abstract themes with a distinct methodology, applying acrylic on glass and then cutting It into strips or small rectangles or triangles of pure paint, collaging them onto the surface of the canvas; the artist's use of close-to-pure abstraction enables him to treat color as a dedicated exploration—it's what gives his art the energy it has.

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Results 1 - 5 of 32
Making Encaustic Medium
I fell in love with encaustic paintings the first time I saw one hanging. There was just something about the work... The luminosity, the transparency, the brilliance. It was unlike anything that I had ever seen before. I knew I had to try it and once I did, I was hooked.
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Introduction to Color Theory
Color is a very broad topic. Entire books have been written on color and it would be quite difficult to cover every aspect of it within the confines of this article. My hopes with this introduction to color theory is to peek your interest and hopefully cause you to study this topic further on your own. Understanding color theory is perhaps one of the most important aspects of becoming a good painter. When you understand the elements of color and how colors interact with one another, you have unlocked one of the biggest puzzles of painting
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How to make your own oil paints
How to make your own oil paintsOil paints are made basically by mixing cold-pressed Linsed oil with pigment or color until a smooth buttery paint is produced. When the oil paint is used and applied to a surface the oil oxidizes or absorbs air and then forms a solid film that binds the pigment to the surface of the painting.
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